2010/11/28

All our pupils go out from Sil School with really high linguistics skills

If Colegio Sil in Barcelona wants to sell its foreign language provision to any but the stupid it might want to consider employing people with relevant skills. "Could do better" doesn't begin to describe this:

LANGUAGES AND IDIOMS THAT WE TEACH AT SIL SCHOOL

LINGUISTICS TRAINING AND LANGUAGES THAT WE TEACH

Our school develops a trilingüal metodology in castellano, catalan and english.

Our linguistic planning from "TRINITY COLLEGE", has as primary aim that all the alumni obtain a fluent oral command, equivalent at FIRST CERTIFICATE degree, therefore the teaching of this language, is carried out since the first years of age, with specialized teaching staff, with extensive time of reglated teaching, and further application of this language in different matters and activities.

The exams, validated by the Oxford University are carried out in our own school.

The certifiyng we deliver once the exams are overcome, are fully recognized by the E.U..

Or school offers the possibility of learning French as a second language at secondary obligatory education (ESO) and High School.

All our pupils go out from Sil School with really high linguistics skills.

(Thanks, Mr O!)

2010/11/15

Dances of the Fart-Vest

Buffalo Bill's visit to Barcelona, marred by transcription problems.

I forget who it was tried to patent a fartvest to combat spinal chills on Antarctic expeditions. Maybe it was me. If Apollo had hardwired something like this into us then her upstairs might have been spared the perennial torment of how to fit a hairdryer disguised as a space capsule into hand luggage without alarming security. But I digress.

2010/11/12

Google Translate: “sóc de catalunya” = “I'm from Spain”

Here, and just as the regional election campaign was getting underway. The state-financed separatist organisation, Òmnium Cultural, believes there is a plot, and is therefore mounting its own campaign to nobble Google Translate.

(H/t Alex)

2010/11/08

Fucked translation, not Hitler's fault, and not without merit

Studiolum over at the excellent Poemas del río Wang has dug up a German-Russian lexicon, published in 1942 by Mittler & Sohn for use by Germany's armed forces, which introduces itself thus:

The war has demonstrated the simplicity of the means with which the German soldier can make himself understood anywhere. The correct words, juxtaposed without regard to grammar, are almost always adequate.

I doubt whether Hitler's Spanish troops on the Eastern Front, the anti-Stalinist División Azul, were as well equipped. The Spanish had perfectly good linguistic tools at that stage, not least because of Soviet participation in their Civil War, but the evidence accumulated on this blog suggests that in Spain dictionaries have often been misused, underused or simply ignored.

And who's to say that the outsights resulting from this approach are any more damaging than the insights achieved by more careful folk? Maybe all you miserable multilingual pedants out there should consider offering your clients hilariously fucked translation as a means of relaxing communications and increasing brand recognition. Just don't ring the Wehrmacht.

[
Apologies to other as yet unpublished contributors: I'm working through a number of backlogs.
]

2010/11/05

Menu of La Florida, Havana, in the late 1970s

Colin has contributed two classics of Galician cuisine, "Mussels to the seaman's blouse" and "Fondle of tit cheese", and another kind person has read the great industrial designer Raymond Loewy's thoroughly entertaining memoir, Never leave well enough alone, and sent in the lunch menu of the Havana café bartended by Constantí Ribalaigua, the Catalan who didn't invent the daiquiri, but who Loewy nevertheless tried to tempt stateside:

LA FLORIDA

LANCH MENNU

SCAMBBLED EGGES
AMBURGŪESE WITH ONNION
PORKSOP WITH BADKED APLE
COLIFLOWER
ERTITSHOK
WATER SCREWS SALADE [watercress salad]

DIPLOMATIC PUDIN

DRIKS

CUBAN COFE               AMERICAN COFE
JIBOL [highball]


Loewy's marvellous description of pre-revolutionary bar-life leads one to commiserate with the translator, but not excessively.