2010/10/07

Junta de Andalucía's Fucked Translation 101: try plagiarism first

Lenox at The Entertainer Online picks up El Mundo's report on the Junta de Andalucía's new tourism portal. Developed at a cost of €5,400,000(!) by Telefónica(!), it was launched by the Andalusian president José Antonio Griñán at a massive junket with 500 guests and the baritone Carlos Álvarez (who I believe makes in the region of €7-8,000 for one-offs of this nature, not having been foolish enough to actually work in tourism in his native Málaga). Luciano Alonso, the regional tourism councillor, announced that this was to be a quality enterprise: "We don't want stuff to be posted there just for the sake of it," he said.

So it's a shame he didn't look at the site pre-launch. Lenox has a delicious sample of fucked translation -

There are still very few who, in a illustrated and planned form, come to Andalucia to enjoy the flamenco tourism. It is our intention that those who wish to know flamenco in Andalucia by tourism, find in this site, ordered and varied references that help you know by a incipient form, of the great cultural and festive treasure, that flamenco supposes.

- and there's piles more. But there's also quite a lot of less fucked English, much of which appears to have been plagiarised from Grupo Albelmar, an Almería-based tour operator. Take for example the Junta's page called Sun and beach:

A thousand kilometres of coastline with one common factor: the Sun. Let yourself be captivated by Andalusia’s coast, where you will find a succession of unspoilt beaches, majestic cliffs, salt marshes teeming with wildlife and a little-known underwater world just waiting to be discovered.

You'll find it a veritable paradise for your holidays. With pleasant temperatures no matter what the season, Andalusia's outstanding beaches are a gift to any traveller.

Small coves and immense golden-sand beaches line the hundreds of kilometres of Andalusia’s coast, where you can enjoy an unforgettable holiday.

Andalusia shares its life between two loves: the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. One is calm and gentle, the other aggressive and exciting; two large coastal areas with their own identities, both governed by a sub-tropical Mediterranean climate. The coast of Andalusia offers you the chance to lose yourself in contemplation of its deep red sunsets and its waters, caressed by the easterly wind.

Andalusia’s beaches are its natural heritage and have their own personality. The coastline, encompassing the Almería Coast, the Costa Tropical in Granada, the Costa del Sol in Malaga, the Costa de la Luz in Cadiz and the Costa de la Luz in Huelva, is an idyllic natural setting, with warm waters and non-stop sunshine.

Mild temperatures join forces with the magic of Andalusia’s towns and villages, its charming harbours and an excellent range of hotels, along with splendid countryside and the convergence of sea and breezes. These are the basic ingredients for a destination not to be missed.

And compare it with Sun & Beach over at Albelmar:

A thousand kilometres of coastline with one common factor: the Sun. Let yourself be captivated by Andalucía’s coast, where you will find a succession of unspoilt beaches, majestic cliffs, salt marshes teeming with wildlife and a little-known underwater world just waiting to be discovered. You will find it a veritable paradise for your holidays. With pleasant temperatures no matter what the season, Andalucía’s outstanding beaches are a gift to any traveller. Small coves and immense golden-sand beaches line the hundreds of kilometres of Andalucía’s coast, where you can enjoy an unforgettable holiday. Andalucía’s beaches are its natural heritage and have their own personality. The coastline, encompassing the Almería Coast, the Costa Tropical in Granada, the Costa del Sol in Malaga, the Costa de la Luz in Cadiz and the Costa de la Luz in Huelva, is an idyllic natural setting, with warm waters and non-stop sunshine. Mild temperatures join forces with the magic of Andalucía’s towns and villages, its charming harbours and an excellent range of hotels, along with splendid countryside and the convergence of sea and breezes. These are the basic ingredients for a destination not to be missed.

Calidá a la andaluza, and what the fuck happened to the 5.4 million?

[
All of this is not to say that Grupo Albelmar is any more angelic than the Junta. Founded in 2002 by inter alia the current Managing Director Nadia Bennouna, the business and associated companies like Hispantour have had repeated brushes with the authorities for the non-payment of social security contributions, transit fines, etc etc. Hispantour achieved brief notoriety in 2006 when the driver of a bus carrying 40 Africans from Almeria to Brussels via Ciudad Real(!) was arrested for driving while banned, seven times over the limit, and talking on his mobile. The bus appears to have been something of an ancient mystery, having changed hands ten times and numberplate thrice. Still, honour among members of the Brotherhood of Dodgy would have been kind of nice.
]

9 comments:

Justin Roberts said...

Oh, I must send you a copy of "The Great Guide of Jerez"...

kalebeul said...

Yes, do!!!

Tom said...

FWIW, I happen to believe that Telefonica wouldn't have been capable of 'developing' that website. God knows who actually did it though.

Candide said...

Tom's got a great point here. (The answer to his question could perfectly be taken from the leitmotif of this blog: any guy in a bar.)

I actually wonder how people in Spain manage to breathe, given that corruption has taken such a hold on society.

For the Catalan supremacists it must be recomforting to see how Andalusians fuck it up even better; and that's how the country goes.

Down the drain.

kalebeul said...

Oh God, and then there's the drains.

Candide said...

With all them critters.

loobyloo said...

I see Pierre Menard's back in the translation racket.

kalebeul said...

For what little it's worth, I wondered a while back whether the origin of Borges' Pierre Menard isn't my favourite Quixote translator, Pierre Motteux (also over at kalebollocks), who was slaughtered by C19th critics for incorporating too much of his own world into Cervantes, for being fun, and for dying of asphyxiophilia in a brothel. All I need to do now is figure the wordplay that connects Motteux and Menard...

Justin Roberts said...

Oh, here. For a laugh. "The Great Guide of Jerez" is now online: http://www.thegreatguideofjerez.com/